Lee Iacocca: "Gore's extreme ideas about cars could cost a lot of Michigan families their jobs." Plain-speaking auto industry giant featured in new ad unveiled by Engler In an aggressive move to highlight Al Gore's public record of extreme positions on the auto industry, Governor John Engler today unveiled a new Michigan GOP television ad featuring former auto industry giant Lee Iacocca. In the 30-second spot, Iacocca explains that if Gore became president, many workers could lose their jobs. "Al Gore's extreme ideas about cars could cost a lot of Michigan families their jobs," Iacocca says in the ad. "Mr. Gore writes, we need to raise gas taxes, and the gasoline engine is a threat to our future and we should scrap it." The ad is designed to communicate to auto workers and their families the threat posed by Al Gore's extreme position on cars, gas taxes and the Kyoto Treaty. Earlier this year the United Auto Workers (UAW) held back their endorsement of the Vice President until the very last minute. Iacocca closes the ad by stating, "Al Gore may see the car as our enemy, but in Michigan, it's our jobs." "Lee Iacocca is proud of Michigan workers, passionate about their jobs and knows the auto industry inside and out. That's why he agreed to do this ad," said Governor John Engler. "Lee Iacocca knows Governor Bush is the man who will protect the jobs of the men and women on the line. Let's face it, Al Gore is about as good for the auto industry as Firestone is for Ford." "Michigan is Ground Zero in this election, and we are putting the full court press on Gore," said Michigan Republican Party Chairman Rusty Hills. "Every union worker should know that Al Gore's policies would devastate the auto-industry. If we can get this message out in the final weeks of this campaign, we will win Michigan." Hills went on to note that Gore's support of the Kyoto Treaty would also hurt Michigan workers. Even Democrat VP candidate Joe Lieberman opposed the Kyoto Treaty before joining the Gore ticket. "It's bad enough Gore wants to eliminate the internal combustion, but Gore also supports the disastrous Kyoto Treaty, which is a job killer, and would hit Michigan harder than any other state," said Hills. "We're the auto capitol, and proud of it. George W. Bush will support the auto industry, and the men and women who make it great." ### MRSC TV:30 "Iacocca" Announcer: Lee Iacocca Lee Iacocca: Hey, we're car people in Michigan. Our state has overcome some tough times to build the best cars on the planet. But Al Gore's extreme ideas about cars could cost a lot of Michigan families their jobs. Mr. Gore writes, we need to raise gas taxes, and the gasoline engine is a threat to our future and we should scrap it. Al Gore may see the car as our enemy, but in Michigan, it's our jobs. Announcer: Log on and learn more about how Al Gore's extreme views threaten Michigan jobs. (Web site on screen: www.SaveMichiganJobs.com.) Clinton/Gore War on Privacy Rights




Posted Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2000 8:35 p.m. EDT

USA Today Blasts Clinton-Gore War on Privacy

In an unusually scathing editorial today, USA Today attacked the Clinton-Gore administration for its assault on privacy rights.

Among the offenses cited:


The nonpartisan congressional General Accounting Office last week revealed that six federal Web sites - including the Postal Service, Forest Service and Small Business Administration - still allowed cookies, computer codes that track visitors.

The Internet privacy group Privacilla pointed out this month that the White House's own Web site broke rules to protect children's privacy by collecting personally identifiable information about children without getting verifiable parental consent.

The Internal Revenue Service commissioner told Republican congressional leaders this month that the IRS Web site did not keep or solicit any "confidential taxpayer information" - but it turns out the site solicits questions on tax law and asks users to give detailed information.

Janet Reno's Department of Justice "has chosen to stonewall" on investigating Carnivore, the FBI's e-mail snooping system, and has hired "an outside group packed with government insiders to perform a softball 'independent review.'"
A Capitol Hill staffer told NewsMax.com tonight: "Ever since the story broke, the administration's been in overdrive to pull the unauthorized cookies from the agency Web sites. Ever since the story broke, the administration has been trying to douse the fire.

"The problem is that this is just the tip of the iceberg, and there are so many other instances where the Clinton-Gore administration has failed to protect privacy," the staffer said.

And the USA Today editorial concludes: "On Tuesday, the White House greeted the latest round of privacy criticism with limp promises for a December update. That's a familiar response. The administration has made privacy promises before without following through. Considering its obtuse handling of Carnivore, it's easy to conclude that the promises don't mean anything this time either."

Maybe these attacks on individual liberty are what Al Gore meant by "taking care of" the little people.

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