Elian and the Florida Vote

In 1996, Bill Clinton received 40 % of the Cuban American vote in Miami Dade County, but this time around, Al Gore was able to win only about 25 % of that
vote. The difference? Elian Gonzalez. The difference? Well, 15 % is much more
than 537 votes!!!




Florida Absentee Ballot Rulings Favor Bush


By DAVID ESPO
.c The Associated Press

(Dec. 8) -- Two Florida judges rejected absentee ballot challenges that threatened George W. Bush's hairline margin as the state Legislature met in special session to assure the Republican governor gets the disputed electoral votes that would give him the White House. The state's Supreme Court weighed Al Gore's demand for a recount of the ballots he says would make him the president.

Democrats contested absentee ballots in Martin and Seminole counties, both carried by Bush by margins far exceeding the 537 votes by which his ticket was certified to have won the state.

Circuit Court Judges Nikki Clark and Terry Lewis ruled jointly, saying that despite irregularities in ballot applications - the basis of the Democrats' challenge - ``neither the sanctity of the ballots nor the integrity of the elections has been compromised.''

Gore was not directly involved in bringing those cases, but he had spoken approvingly of the Democratic attempt to erase 25,000 absentee ballots and tip the balance in his favor. He has not said whether he would yield and concede the election before appeals on the two cases are settled.

``We're hopeful that we'll finally see finality in this election,'' Bush told reporters Friday as he met with top aides in Texas. ``It's time to get on with America's business.''

Gore was in Washington, awaiting a verdict from the Supreme Court. One Democratic senator said a defeat there and ``this battle's over ... I think this is the definitive day,'' added Sen. Robert Torricelli, D-N.J., as the courts pondered their cases 31 days after Election Day.

Across the street from the Florida Supreme Court building in Tallahassee, members of the Republican-controlled Legislature gathered in historic special session, and the GOP leadership pushed legislation assuring the prized electoral votes would go to Bush.

``The Legislature is convened for the sole and exclusive purpose'' of making sure the state's electoral votes count when the Electoral College meets on Dec. 18, read John Phelps, the clerk of the House, speaking before a packed chamber and a nationwide television audience. The legislation itself listed the electors by name - the ones picked by Bush when GOP Secretary of State Katherine Harris certified him the statewide winner last month by 537 votes.

The speaker of the Florida House, Tom Feeney, acknowledged he has received advice from Bush intermediaries but denied the campaign was calling the shots. Such allegations from Democrats were ``out of touch'' with reality, he said.

But the Bush campaign said its lawyers ``provided legal interpretations when asked by legislators, and no one could be surprised by that. Nor would anyone be surprised if such contacts occurred between Democratic legislators and Gore lawyers,'' said a spokesman, Tucker Eskew.

In a last-minute legal maneuver, Bush's lawyers filed an unusual clarification with the Supreme Court, telling the seven justices they don't have authority to grant Gore the manual recounts he seeks.

``This Court does not have authority to grant such relief under Florida law or federal law,'' the Bush petition said, reversing comments Bush attorney Barry Richard made Thursday in oral arguments that the high court had ``limited'' jurisdiction.

Gore has been attempting to overturn Bush's certified win in the courts, and win the manual recounting of thousands of ballots he says could reverse his rival's lead. The winner of the state's 25 electoral votes stands to take office in January as the nation's 43rd president.

Torricelli offered his brutally simple prediction on CBS, saying, ``If Al Gore cannot persuade the Florida Supreme Court ... then this battle's over.''

Gore adviser Ron Klain said the vice president's team viewed the state Supreme Court as ``the final arbiter of Florida law'' and he acknowledged the obvious in saying a loss there ``would be a setback for us, and a major one.''

But Klain, also on CBS, said he's been party to no talk of a concession by Gore. Klain would not commit Gore to bowing out if he loses in the state Supreme Court. ``We think we'll win,'' he said.

Depending on the outcome of Gore's appeal, the legislation contemplated by GOP leaders could set up a contest between two rival Florida slates when the Electoral College votes are cast Dec. 18 and then counted in Congress on Jan. 6. That, in turn, could ratchet up the controversy even further in the contest to pick a president.

In Thursday's high court hearing, Gore lawyer David Boies implored the court to grant the selective manual recounts that could yet revive the vice president's hopes of winning the White House.

The Florida high court offered no hint of when it would rule, although the seven justices moved with unusual speed a little more than two weeks ago in an earlier recount-related case. This time, if anything, the time pressure is even greater, since Dec. 12 is the deadline for appointing the state's 25 presidential electors.

Both absentee ballot cases were filed by Democrats - and have since been cited approvingly by Gore - claiming that the ballots are invalid because detachable ballot applications were not properly filled out and elections officials allowed information to be added improperly.

Either of those two cases had the potential to transform a controversy that had Gore struggling for survival and Bush working conspicuously on his transition to power.

But the main focus on Thursday was in state Supreme Court, where Boies pressed Gore's case to open up roughly 13,000 ballots in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties to a manual recount, and where Richard argued the justices would be exceeding their legal authority if they did so.

Both men were barraged with questions.

``We're now here on December the 7th, with December the 12th, you know, fast approaching,'' Justice Harry Lee Anstead told Boies in the final question of the session. ``How can we resolve an issue like that at this late date?''

``There's never been a rule that says you have to recount all the ballots in an election contest,'' Boies replied, returning one final time to his point that only a small fraction of more than 1 million ballots need be reviewed.

Besides, he said, the Bush campaign never asked for a recount.

AP-NY-12-08-00 1506EST


Bush Says Would Appeal Fla. Ruling

By TOM RAUM
.c The Associated Press


AUSTIN, Texas (AP) - George W. Bush expressed optimism on Friday that ``we'll finally see finality'' in the election as crucial court decisions neared and he worked on assembling a prospective White House staff and Cabinet.

Still, the Texas governor said he was prepared to appeal an adverse decision to the U.S. Supreme Court, if necessary, even if it would further prolong the process.

``I hope that doesn't take place,'' Bush said. ``I obviously hope the justices in Florida rule in our favor. We'll see what they do.''

Bush spoke to reporters after he and several top advisers conducted a conference call with running mate Dick Cheney and other campaign officials in the Bush transition headquarters in the Virginia suburbs of Washington, D.C.

He talked separately with James A. Baker III, the head of his legal team, in Florida.

``The folks in Florida anticipate a decision, and feel like our lawyers made a good, strong case. I think, you know, we are hopeful that we'll finally see finality when it comes to this election. It's time to get on with America's business. But we'll see what the courts decide today,'' he said.

But despite the words of optimism, Bush was subdued in tone.

Asked if he thought there would be a president-elect by day's end, Bush raised the possibility of a ruling against him by the Florida Supreme Court. ``We're prepared if need be to take our case back to the (U.S.) Supreme Court,'' he said.

As to whether the candidate who loses Friday's court rulings should concede the election, Bush said, ``Each candidate is going to have to decide to make the decision that's best for the country.''

Bush said he was busy assembling a White House staff-in-waiting and planning Cabinet appointments should he be victorious in the drawn-out court battles.

``We're making pretty good progress. We're thinking about different names,'' Bush said.

Bush was spending the day in Austin. After the morning session with advisers, he worked for about an hour in his state Capitol office, then chatted outside with spectators and even posed for a picture with a woman in a bridal gown. The woman, Angela Freeman, 28, was having a wedding portrait made on the capitol steps as Bush emerged.

Seated with at the session in the governor's mansion were Andrew Card, already designated as the prospective White House chief of staff and top advisers Karen Hughes and Karl Rove.

Asked about his White House staff selections, Bush said, ``You're looking at a couple of them.''

According to senior advisers who spoke on the condition of anonymity, Bush has selected Hughes to be a senior White House counselor. She was communications director and top spokeswoman for the campaign, but will have less to do with the press corps at the White House.

Bush also has offered a top spot to Rove, although details remained to be worked out, the sources said.

Others include:

Josh Bolton, top policy aide in the campaign, who will take a similar role at the White House.

Ari Fleischer as his spokesman in charge of daily briefings. Fleischer works for Hughes now.

Larry Lindsey, a Federal Reserve member during Bush's father's administration, as Bush's top economic adviser at the White House.

Stanford University administrator Condoleezza Rice as national security adviser.

Bush also has settled on retired Army Gen. Colin Powell as secretary of state, a selection Bush alluded to again on Friday.

Bush aides expect that, should the courts rule in his favor and rival Al Gore concede, he first would speak to supporters at a victory rally, then announce some top appointments at a news conference here the following day.

Then, Bush likely would fly to Washington to announce some Cabinet posts and pay a courtesy call on outgoing President Clinton, aides said.

AP Political Writer Ron Fournier contributed to this report from Washington.

AP-NY-12-08-00 1335EST

Agitators Probe for Defectors Among Electors
Politics: If a few of these chosen loyalists break faith with Bush, it would hand the presidency to Gore. But that effort is an uphill battle.


By SCOTT MARTELLE, Times Staff Writer

As the two major parties near the end of their vicious war for the White House, Democratic activists and would-be political reformers are quietly pressing Republican electors to do the unthinkable: Vote for Democrat Al Gore.
Less a movement than a series of individual and overlapping acts, the agitators seek to split away two or three votes from among George W. Bush's anticipated 271 Republican electors when the all-important electoral college convenes Dec. 18.
If three Bush electors defect and vote for Gore, then the Democrats would win the White House regardless of the current court battles. If two defect, the election would be sent to the Republican-dominated House of Representatives.
While few expect the agitators to succeed in creating what are known as "faithless electors," their efforts add yet another odd twist to an election that has already set new standards for bizarreness.
The biggest hurdle is the nature of the electors themselves--most are selected as a payoff for years of party loyalty. And Gore himself has rebuffed the efforts.
"We're very proud to have earned the popular vote support during this election, but we are not seeking nor in anyway trying to get electors to switch over," Gore spokesman Chris Lehane said Tuesday.
Lehane, however, acknowledged that, in the unlikely event the effort is successful, Gore would have little choice but to accept the presidency, despite earlier comments by the vice president that he would reject the votes.
"They can vote for whomever they choose, and if Gore gets 270 votes in the electoral college he's the president," said Erwin Chemerinsky, a professor at the USC Law School. "He has no authority to concede the election to Bush in a legal sense, though if he does by announcement then it's less likely that the electors would [flip]."
Those involved in the effort range from two Claremont McKenna College seniors dismayed by the prospect of seating a president who placed second in the popular vote, to a New Hampshire lab technician who urged his state's four electors to reject tradition for the public will.
"I think there is corruption, and the election was unfair in Florida," said Thomas Richard, a Concord, N.H., Gore supporter. "Electors have some discretion in who they vote for in New Hampshire. They're not bound by state law to vote for the elector that they're pledged to. So they ought to use their discretion, especially when the election was so close and the popular vote was greater for Gore."
In Pennsylvania, T.J. Rooney, a state representative from the Lehigh Valley and a Democratic elector, has undertaken his own campaign to buttonhole four or five Republican electors he knows in other states to entice them to vote for Gore.
"They listen to what I have to say," Rooney said. "Perhaps they're just listening out of kindness or collegiality, but I think there's a strong case to be made. . . . I am firmly of the opinion that if every vote was counted in Florida, [Gore] will have earned the 25 electors."
David Enrich is one of the Claremont McKenna students behind the Citizens for True Democracy Web site at www.claremontmckenna.com/ctd/index.html that urges people to lobby Republican electors to vote for Gore. The Web site has received more than 54,200 visits since it was posted two days after the election.
Enrich said he and roommate Matt Grossmann of Columbia, Mo., are targeting the process, not the candidates, and would have sought Gore defectors had the circumstances been reversed.
"This is an effort on our part to draw attention to a system that we think is grossly unfair and anti-democratic and in great need of reform," said Enrich, 21, of Boston. "We think this is kind of a golden opportunity to reform it."
But Republicans see something more nefarious going on--an attempt by Democrats to circumvent the process.
"It is in keeping with some of the usual tactics we've seen by the Democrats since the election," said Bush spokesman Ray Sullivan. "Ultimately, we believe that Republican electors across the country are and will continue to be committed to Gov. Bush and do not believe that they will be persuaded to turn their backs on their party or on our nominee."
While some Republican electors have been swamped with e-mails, others said they're aware of the campaign but have not been contacted. Still others said they have heard from more fellow Republicans urging them to stand firm than from people encouraging them to flip.
One of the more overt efforts began with Bob Beckel, a longtime Democratic analyst and chairman of Walter F. Mondale's 1984 White House campaign. Beckel announced in the days after the November election that he was amassing information on Republican electors to try to find ways to persuade them to shift allegiances.
Beckel has since said he meant only to gather information on how to contact the electors. But his initial announcement unleashed a storm of protests by Bush supporters. Repeated attempts to reach Beckel for comment were unsuccessful.
For all their efforts, the agitators face a considerable tide of history. There has been only a handful of faithless electors going back almost 200 years, and none affected an election's outcome.
Marcia Nippert, chairwoman of the Bush-Cheney campaign in Florida's Sarasota County, has no intention of becoming a footnote to electoral college history.
"My job is to reflect the vote of Florida, and that's for George W. Bush. I would be remiss if I didn't represent my state," Nippert said. "It's a little bit insulting. I consider that I'm doing the right and appropriate thing by voting for George W. Bush."
John McCutcheon of Caldwell, W. Va., is one of the few electors whose e-mail address is posted in the Citizens for True Democracy Web site. He is receiving about two dozen messages a day urging him to vote for Gore.
But he said he's getting twice that amount from fellow Republicans.
"The more inspiring ones are from folks who say, 'Look, I hear you're getting beat up. Stick to your guns,' " said McCutcheon, a political consultant and executive director of the Bush campaign in West Virginia.
McCutcheon, like most of the Republican electors, is a veteran of campaigns and said he takes the contacts in stride, deleting most of them as he would junk e-mail.
"You could set me on fire and I wouldn't change my mind," he said.

ELECTION 2000, Day 32
Dimple theory dealt new blow
Miami elections official says precincts
reported no ballot-punching problems

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By Paul Sperry
2000 WorldNetDaily.com

WASHINGTON -- In a new blow to Al Gore's claim that clogged voting equipment prevented hundreds of Miami-Dade County voters from cleanly punching the ballot for him, the county's No. 2 elections official told WorldNetDaily that his office received no reports of such voting problems on Election Day or since then.
Lawyers for Gore have argued that chad -- the little perforated squares on the ballot that count as votes when removed -- piled inside voting-booth trays to the point where they backed up against ballot punch-holes and blocked the insertion of styluses.

"I have not heard anyone complain about that, and I hear a hell of a lot of problems that go on at precincts," said John Clouser, Miami-Dade County assistant supervisor of elections.

He says he heard no such complaints despite installing about 100 extra phones at election headquarters and hiring about 100 extra workers to man them on Election Day.

He also says no clerks at the county's 578 polling places felt the need to call county maintenance workers to clean out chad trays in the vote recorders used in the Votomatic booths.

"I'm also in charge of our warehouse, and obviously, they would have gotten calls at our warehouse saying, 'Hey, we need cleaned-out Votomatics,' " Clouser said.

The only complaints about the booths involved a few burned-out fluorescent bulbs, which were replaced, he says.

Clouser, a Democrat, says the Gore claim is a "red herring."

"And of course, the press is going for it," he said.

He estimates -- based on the testimony of one of the inventors of the vote recorder, who last weekend said it would take 1 million to 1.5 million chad to block a stylus -- that it would take a minimum of 400 presidential elections to pack a tray full enough to make Gore's claim plausible.

"If you say that there were 2,500 chad per Votomatic per presidential election, we'd have to do the equivalent of 400 to 600 presidential elections in order to fill these things up," Clouser said.

"And I don't think we've had 400 to 600 presidential elections since 1977," he quipped, when the county started using the Votomatic. And that assumes the trays weren't cleaned out.

Clouser says he's never used the Votomatic to vote. He's had to vote by absentee ballot, because he can't take time out from his official duties on Election Day to vote.

So he decided to finally use the Votomatic himself, in conducting an experiment to see how hard it would be for the novice voter to punch out the chad after following the instructions in the booth.

"On Thanksgiving day, I took 20 ballot cards each with 312 positions (or perforated squares). I punched through each one of the 312 positions," he said. "That's 6,240 chad that went down into the (trays of the) vote recorders."

"I pulled all 20 cards out (of the throat of the vote recorder). Guess what? Clean as a whistle -- every single one of them. No hangers. Nothing," Clouser added. "All I did was follow the instructions."

Gore, who is contesting President-elect George W. Bush's certified 537-vote Florida win, wants some 9,000 undervoted ballots in Miami-Dade County checked by hand for indentations, or "dimples," in the chad next to his name.

He insists that hundreds, if not thousands, of voters meant to vote for him, but failed to punch through the ballot and register a hole that would be picked up by the counting machine.

The Florida Supreme Court is deliberating over whether to uphold or overturn a lower-court decision to block a hand recount of the ballots there.

The court earlier had allowed a hand recount after Gore protested the election results. But Miami-Dade, seeing it couldn't meet the court-imposed deadline, stopped its recount after looking at just some of the total 10,750 ballots with no votes for president.

Clouser says the blank votes usually are not a mistake, or oversight, but a form of protest by voters.

"Take my sister-in-law in California, for example. She told me, 'John, I don't like either of these people, so I said to heck with it and didn't vote for president,' "he said. "She consciously made that decision."

Some voters also may have decided to skip the top race because they were overwhelmed by the unusually thick field of presidential candidates. Florida listed 10 names on its ballot -- the most of any state.

Clouser says that if Gore is allowed to inspect the ballots by hand, the officials doing the inspecting should not find any indentations that shouldn't be there.

He says he kept a tight chain of custody over the ballots, starting with their storage in the warehouse. The ballots are now in the custody of the circuit court in Tallahassee, Fla.

"They have been under a legal chain of custody. That is, we've had police officers here around the clock," Clouser said. "That has cost taxpayers $2,500 per day for about 30 days."

He also says he inspected the ballots for flaws several weeks before they were sent out to the precincts.

"We have someone go to the warehouse and check the condition of the ballot cards before we distribute them," he said, "so that we don't have any surprises on election night."

The warehouse inspector, who "has two engineering degrees," has worked for the county 25 years, he said.

Clouser adds that the warehouse is climate-controlled to protect the cards from warping or buckling from the Miami humidity.

"They were kept in an air-conditioned, locked room," he said.

Clouser says the process of printing the cards does not create any dimpling.

"We've never had a problem with dimples or the quality of the chad on the ballot cards after we've gotten them from the printers," he said.

Miami-Dade contracts with Omaha, Neb.-based Election Systems & Software Inc. to print its ballot cards. The company prints them at a plant in Addison, Texas.

Clouser, who's in charge of procuring voting equipment, says he's looking at newer systems, such as optical-scanned paper balloting, to replace the Votomatic, even though he says it's worked fine -- at least until Gore's legal team made a fuss.

"The punch-card system has worked pretty well for us for 23 years," he said.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Paul Sperry is Washington bureau chief for WorldNetDaily.

Friday, Dec. 8, 2000 1:49 p.m. EST

Gore's War on Military Voters
Prompts Dem to Switch Party


El Cajon, Calif., Mayor Mark Lewis switched his party affiliation from Democrat to Republican earlier this week, saying the conduct of Vice President Al Gore in the post-election crisis was "the final straw."

Lewis, who has been a Democrat for his entire adult life, told NewsMax.com that he was particularly angered by Gore lawyers who tried to exclude military absentee ballots.

"My whole family is ex-military," Lewis said. "My father was retired military and his death was service connected. I think we need to honor Americans who serve their country, not try to screen out their votes."

"It used to be that the Democrats were the party of the people," Lewis added. "But now we're to the point where it's the party of attorneys, judge shopping and things like that. I think they've disappointed a lot of Americans with this action."

Lewis says he believes Gore lawyers targeted military absentee voters because they didn't expect them to vote Democratic. "Their attempts to disqualify those votes because of a lack of signature or lack of a date or even a postmark is just irresponsible," he added.

El Cajon's mayor is a former president of the East County Democratic Club. Both he and his wife are members of the state party Democratic Central Committee.

Or at least they were. Mrs. Lewis intends to join her husband next week in the GOP.

"I've worked very hard for the Democratic Party for over 30 years," said Mayor Lewis. "Now, I'll work just as hard for the Republican Party."


Florida Supreme Court Orders Recount
in Partisan Swipe at US Supreme Court

.c The Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (Dec. 8) - A sharply divided Florida Supreme Court ordered manual recounts to begin in Florida's contested presidential election on Friday, breathing new life into Al Gore's quest for the White House.

''Because time is of the essence, the recount will commence immediately,'' said the court's spokesman, Craig Waters.

On a ruling of 4-3, the court also added 383 votes to Gore's total.

George W. Bush was certified the winner of the state's contested election by 537 votes, and the court's ruling threw that in doubt. Cheers erupted from the vice president's supporters gathered at the steps of the courthouse where Waters read a statement summarizing the opinion.

Earlier Friday, two Florida judges rejected absentee ballot challenges that threatened Bush's hairline margin as the state Legislature met in special session to assure the Republican governor gets the disputed electoral votes that would give him the White House.

Democrats contested absentee ballots in Martin and Seminole counties, both carried by Bush by margins far exceeding the 537 votes by which his ticket was certified to have won the state.

Circuit Court Judges Nikki Clark and Terry Lewis ruled jointly, saying that despite irregularities in ballot applications - the basis of the Democrats' challenge - ''neither the sanctity of the ballots nor the integrity of the elections has been compromised.''

Gore was not directly involved in bringing those cases, but he had spoken approvingly of the Democratic attempt to erase 25,000 absentee ballots and tip the balance in his favor.

Across the street from the Florida Supreme Court building in Tallahassee, members of the Republican-controlled Legislature gathered in historic special session, and the GOP leadership pushed legislation assuring the prized electoral votes would go to Bush.

''The Legislature is convened for the sole and exclusive purpose'' of making sure the state's electoral votes count when the Electoral College meets on Dec. 18, read John Phelps, the clerk of the House, speaking before a packed chamber and a nationwide television audience. The legislation itself listed the electors by name - the ones picked by Bush when GOP Secretary of State Katherine Harris certified him the statewide winner last month by 537 votes.

The speaker of the Florida House, Tom Feeney, acknowledged he has received advice from Bush intermediaries but denied the campaign was calling the shots. Such allegations from Democrats were ''out of touch'' with reality, he said.

But the Bush campaign said its lawyers ''provided legal interpretations when asked by legislators, and no one could be surprised by that. Nor would anyone be surprised if such contacts occurred between Democratic legislators and Gore lawyers,'' said a spokesman, Tucker Eskew.

Gore has been attempting to overturn Bush's certified win in the courts, and win the manual recounting of thousands of ballots he says could reverse his rival's lead. The winner of the state's 25 electoral votes stands to take office in January as the nation's 43rd president.

The legislation contemplated by GOP leaders could set up a contest between two rival Florida slates when the Electoral College votes are cast Dec. 18 and then counted in Congress on Jan. 6. That, in turn, could ratchet up the controversy even further in the contest to pick a president.

Both absentee ballot cases were filed by Democrats - and have since been cited approvingly by Gore - claiming that the ballots are invalid because detachable ballot applications were not properly filled out and elections officials allowed information to be added improperly.

Either of those two cases had the potential to transform a controversy that had Gore struggling for survival and Bush working conspicuously on his transition to power.

AP-NY-12-08-00 1610EST



TO ALL ELECTION INTEGRITY INTERNET ACTIVISTS:

Keep it up! The Democratic leadership is feeling the heat.

It's only a matter of time before they're going to have to
back off on their support for Al Gore and join the call for
him to concede.

For example, I just read an article about a Democratic mayor
of El Cajon, California who switched his party affiliation
from Democrat to Republican because he didn't like the dirty
tactics Al Gore is using to attempt to overturn the election.

Mayor Mark Lewis, had this to say, "Over 600,000 servicemen
and women gave their lives in this last century to ensure
American freedoms, including our fundamental right to vote.
It is a despicable act to deny these brave people this same
right. I can no longer consider myself a Democrat when the
leader of the Democratic Party, supported by other elected
Democrat officials take this position. This is the final
straw. I didn't leave my party - my party left me."

It's great news to see that people who voted for Al Gore and
even elected officials from his own party breaking ranks.

And Mayor Lewis is absolutely right. Disenfranchising the
military is as low as you sink. As American citizens we owe
a debt of gratitude to the military.

The least we can do is defend their fundamental right to
vote.

If you want more info on this issue, go to
http://www.countthemilitary.com/root/A374.cfm
The site is sponsored by the United States Justice
Foundation a non-profit legal foundation that's suing the
Florida Elections Commission to make sure military votes
are properly counted. They're also trying to put pressure
on the House and Senate Armed Forces Committees to fully
investigate why and how many military ballots were tossed
out of the Florida Election.

I highly recommend that you check out this site and send
any of your friends or relatives who are in the military
to that site also.

For Election Integrity,

Bruce Eberle

Return to beginning of ejps
Return to beginning of this issue