JOHNSON UNIVERSITY/Kissimmee Campus
COURSE SYLLABUS
Spring 2018
HIST 2100 United States History to 1877

WF 1;10 pm – 2:25 pm

Ron Ziegler
Contact Information:
ronaldgordonziegler@yahoo.com
321-805-2507

Attendance Policy: Class attendance is required beginning with the first day of class.
Class attendance is critical to success in this course. Attendance is taken at the conclusion of each class.

Text: Online American History text

Course Description:

HIST 2100 American History I (3).
This is a study of the social, political, economic, religious and cultural developments of the United States
from the era of exploration and settlement through the Civil War.
It focuses on events and processes involved in the expansion of the United States
to the Pacific Ocean and leading to the Civil War.

This course fulfills outcome requirements of our Teacher Education program.

Course Prerequisites: None

Course Objectives: This course is designed to accomplish the following objectives.
• Students will be able to recall the principal persons, places, and events from the chronological framework of this course.
• Students will be able to synthesize the thematic historical influences that shaped the early history of the United States.
• Students will be able to explain the impact of the individual, regardless of societal rank, as participants in the making of history.
• Students will be able to access the role that diversity plays in the shaping of the early history of the United States.
• Students will be able to detect the lessons, patterns or characteristics from historical events to better understand present day happenings.
• Students will be able to interpret historical events by using appropriate historical methods.

Major Learning Outcomes:
1. Students will be able to recall the principal persons, places, and events from the chronological framework of this course.
2. Students will be able to synthesize the thematic historical influences that shaped the early history of the United States.
3. Students will be able to explain the impact of the individual, regardless of societal rank, as participants in the making of history.
4. Students will be able to assess the role that diversity plays in the shaping of the early history of the United States.
5. Students will be able to detect the lessons, patterns or characteristics from historical events to better understand present day happenings
6. Students will be able to interpret historical events by using appropriate historical methods.

Students are expected to come to class prepared to engage in discussion.
In order to fulfill this requirement, students are expected to prepare for class by reading the text,
and completing any research and/or written work assignments.
In the course of classroom discussions, the professor will take the liberty to call upon students for a response.
To avoid possible embarrassment, come to class prepared to participate.

SCHEDULE OF WORK

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MODULE ONE
Wed 1/10 Syllabus, Course Requirements, etc.
Fri 1/12 read Chapter 1,2
read Forked Tongue
Wed 1/17 read Ch 3,4
view Great Global Warming Swindle on line and turn in 500 word comment on it
with first two exams at end of Feb.
Fri 1/19 read Chapter 5,6
Wed 1/24 read Chapter 7,8
Read What is an American? By De Crevoceur
Go Here
and submit 500 word comment with midterm
Fri 1/26 read chapter 9,10
Roots part 1 – viewed in class – submit 500 word commentary about it
with exams 1 and 2, March 2)

It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace–
but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears
the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field!
Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have?
Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery?
Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me,
give me liberty or give me death!

Patrick Henry

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MODULE TWO
1/31 read Chapter 11
2/2 read Chapter 12
view film Declaration of Independence
2/7 read Chapter 13
2/9 read Chapter 14
view "America - the movie" in class --
turn in 500 word comment on it
with first two exams at end of Feb.
2/14 read Chapter 15
2/16 read Ch 16
2/21 read Ch 17
2/23 read Ch 18
2/28 read Ch 19
3/2 read Ch 20

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,
that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,
that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. —
That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men,
deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,
— That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends,
it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government,
laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form,
as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established
should not be changed for light and transient causes;
and accordingly all experience hath shewn that mankind are more disposed to suffer,
while evils are sufferable than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object
evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty,
to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

Declaration of Independence

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MODULE THREE
3/7 Read Ch 21
Exam # 1 and 2 are due/emailed to instructor yahoo
together with first two article and film reviews
3/9 read Ch 22
3/14 read Ch 23
3/16 read Ch 24
3/21 – Spring Break
3/23 – Spring Break
3/28 read Chapter 25
view film – Trail of Tears in class
and submit 500 word commentary about it with exams 3 and 4 by end of term)
3/30 No Class - Good Friday

Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity,
religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism,
who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness,
these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens.
The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them.
A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity.
Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life,
if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are
the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge
the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion.
Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure,
reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality
can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.

Farewell Address of George Washington

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MODULE FOUR
4/4 read Chapter 26
4/6 read Chapter 27,28
4/11 read Chapter 29,30
4/13 read Chapter 31
view film- Lincoln documentary in class – write 500 word commentary about it
to submit with exams 3 and 4 by May 2)
4/18 read Chapter 32
4/20 read Chapter 33
4/25 read Chapter 34
4/27 read Chapter 35
5/2 Exam # 3 and 4 are due/emailed to instructor yahoo together
with article and film reviews 3 and 4

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent,
a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation,
or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure.
We are met on a great battle-field of that war.
We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those
who here gave their lives that that nation might live.
It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate -- we cannot consecrate --
we cannot hallow -- this ground.
The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it,
far above our poor power to add or detract.
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here,
but it can never forget what they did here.
It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work
which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.
It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us --
that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause
for which they gave the last full measure of devotion --
that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain --
that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government
of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln

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Grading There are seven grading instruments for this course, each counted equally
Your final grade in the class will be an average of the six grades
All work will be submitted to instructor’s yahoo email
ronaldgordonziegler@yahoo.com

Exam # 1
Exam # 2
Exam # 3
Exam # 4
Five Article Reviews – submitted with each exam 3 and 2
Five Film Reviews -- 500 word commentaries about four films viewed in class Participation

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WHAT YOU WILL BE SUBMITTING TO INSTRUCTOR

Module 1 - completed Jan 2018
submitted March 2 2018

Exam 1
Read and write 500 word review one of these three articles from Independent Review to submit
with exam 1, de Crevocour article and Global Warming film reviews along with Roots film review –
Neoliberalism Go Here
or Read Liberalism and Common Good
Go Here
or Constitutional Engineering in Africa)
Go Here


Module 2 – Feb 2018
Second Exam – Due March 2
Exam 2
Select an article about American History to 1877 from the William and Mary Quarterly in data base
and write a 500 word critical review it to turn in with exam 2 along with America and Great Global Warming Swindle film reviews.

Module 3 – March 2018
Third Exam – Due April 27
Exam 3
Select an article about American History to 1877 from the Journal of Negro History in the data base
and write a 500 word critical review it to turn in with exam 3
along with Trail of Tears and Lincoln documentary film review

Module 4 – April 2018
Fourth Exam – Due April 27
Exam 4
Select an article from the Journal of American History in the data base
and write a 500 word critical review it to turn in with exam 4
along with Lincoln film review

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Academic Honesty: All forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited at Johnson University.
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: plagiarism (turning in written work that you took,
word for word, from another source and presenting such work is your own),
cheating, furnishing false information, forgery, alteration or misuse of documents,
misconduct during a testing situation, and misuse of identification with intent to defraud or deceive.

Plagiarism is often misunderstood. For the purposes of this class, plagiarism is defined as: turning in written work
that contains undocumented material from another source and pretending such work is your own.
Cutting and pasting portions of material from on-line sources can be considered plagiarism – including improperly cited websites.
To avoid plagiarism, always include proper citations/links for your sources.

All work submitted by students in this class is expected to be the result of the students’ individual thoughts, research, and self-expression.
Whenever a student uses ideas, wording, or organization from another source, the source shall be appropriately acknowledged.
Students found plagiarizing on graded coursework will receive a “0” for the assignment.




Guidelines for Written Work:
All written work submitted to the professor must meet the following guidelines in addition to collegiate standards for grammar and spelling.
All work must be typed.
When submitting work electronically to instructor's yahoo address, it must be in a .doc format.
Always cite your sources! Use in-text citations.
Citations are required, even if you are paraphrasing or if the only source you use is the course textbook.
Do NOT use MLA format for your citations or Works Cited

Disclaimer Statement: Changes in the syllabus and/or schedule may be made by the professor at any time
during the course and will be announced in class. It is your responsibility to stay informed of any changes.

Module 1 - Jan 2018
First Exam – Due Feb 28
http://ejournalofpoliticalscience.org/earlyamericanhistoryexam1.html
Module 2 – Feb 2018
Second Exam – Due Feb 28
http://ejournalofpoliticalscience.org/earlyamericanhistoryexam2.html
Module 3 – March 2018
Third Exam – Due April 26
http://ejournalofpoliticalscience.org/earlyamericanhistoryexam3.html
Module 4 – Module 2018
Fourth Exam – Due April 26
http://ejournalofpoliticalscience.org/earlyamericanhistoryexam4.html


All of your assignments outside of class are presented in this syllabus,
and all work is submitted to instructor’s email at ronaldgordonziegler@yahoo.com

Class Cancellation
If a class is cancelled, all assignments, due dates, and material will be pushed back one class period.

Contacting Instructor
You may contact the instructor through email at RonaldGordonZiegler@yahoo.com
or by calling/texting at 321-805-2507 (cell).
You may leave a voice mail.
If necessary, I will contact you as necessary.
If you have to miss a class, it is advisable that you contact the instructor
with that information beforehand.

About Your Instructor

Ron Ziegler taught high school in Detroit, Michigan from 1967 until his retirement in 1999.
During those years, he also taught adult education classes with the Cass Outreach program,
and Kettering, and Hazel Park.
Since 1987, he has taught political science, history, and economics
at Detroit College of Business/Davenport College, Wayne State University, and Valencia College.
He earned his Bachelors degree in education and political science from Wayne State University
in Detroit in 1968, where he also was awarded a Masters degree in political science in 1980.
He completed work on his PhD in political science and history there as well.